Physician Quick Search
By Name:
By Specialty:
314-TOP-DOCS
When you need to get the name of one of the nation’s top doctors as close to home as St. Louis, just call 314-TOP-DOCS (314-867-3627) or toll free 1-866-867-3627. This is the physician referral and health information line from Barnes-Jewish Hospital.
Your Healthy Update

Like us on Facebook
Text Size: S M L
Search

Internal Medicine / Geriatrics and Nutritional Science

Samuel Klein, MD

Current Position
William H. Danforth Professor of Medicine and Nutritional Science
Director, Center for Human Nutrition
Chief, Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Science
Director, Center for Applied Research Sciences
Director, Weight Management Program


Specialty Areas
Gastroenterology
Nutrition
Weight Management

Additional Features and Interviews with Dr. Klein:

Ask the Expert - Ladue News:  The Ingredients of a Realistric Diet Plan

Your Health Update - Gain to Lose, Research Study is Looking for Overweight Volunteers

Mailing Address
Washington University School of Medicine,
Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Science
660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8031
St. Louis, MO  63110

Areas of Clinical Interest
Obesity, nutrition, weight management, gastroenterology, metabolism

Board Certification
Gastroenterology -- Certified
Internal Medicine -- Certified
Nutrition -- Certified

This physician provides professional consultation only.

Medical Education
B.A.: Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts, 1974
Medical Degree: Temple University Medical School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1979
M.S.: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1984
Hospital Affiliations
Barnes-Jewish Hospital

Editorial Responsibilities

Associate Editor
Gastroenterology

Editorial Board
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
American Journal of Physiology Endocrinology & Metabolism

Disclosure of Financial Interests with Industry
Washington University and its physicians are committed to ensuring integrity and objectivity in medical decision-making. Some of our physicians work collaboratively with pharmaceutical or medical device companies to develop innovative ideas and products that can improve health care delivery and clinical outcomes for patients. In some instances, our faculty physicians are paid by these commercial companies to provide advice on product design or to speak about the use of medications, devices, equipment or procedures. These payments may include: a) compensation for consulting and speaking engagements, b) equity, and/or c) royalties for products invented by our faculty. Any payments to Washington University physicians must be based on tangible services and may not exceed fair market value for their work. In addition to disclosure on this web site, physicians earning more than $10,000 per year must disclose their corporate financial relationship in writing to patients when prescribing or using that company's products.

Dr. Samuel Klein reported the following earned financial interests during calendar year 2011. Move your mouse over a header for more info.
Company
Royalties
Royalties: When a faculty member invents or conceives a new or improved process or product, the company that manufactures the product will make royalty payments to the faculty member. Royalty payments usually are a small percentage of the company’s revenue related to that product.
Equity
Equity: Equity is an ownership interest in a company. Faculty members may be paid for their service to a company in stock or the option to obtain stock.
Consulting &
Advisory Boards
Consulting and Advisory Boards: Faculty may be paid to provide expertise to a company by being their consultant, or by serving on an advisory board.
Speaker Fees
Speaker Fees: Companies may pay faculty to speak to professional audiences about their products.
Aspiration  Yes   
To learn more about Washington University's policies on collaborations with industry, click here.

Selected or Recent Journal Articles
Yoshino J, Klein S. A novel link between circadian clocks and adipose tissue energy metabolism. Diabetes. 2013 Jul.

Pepino MY, Tiemann CD, Patterson BW, Wice BM, Klein S. Sucralose Affects Glycemic and Hormonal Responses to an Oral Glucose Load. Diabetes Care. 2013 Apr 30.

Magkos F, Bradley D, Schweitzer GG, Finck BN, Eagon JC, Ilkayeva O, Newgard CB, Klein S. Effect of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding on Branched-Chain Amino Acid Metabolism. Diabetes. 2013 Aug.

Fabbrini E, Cella M, McCartney SA, Fuchs A, Abumrad NA, Pietka TA, Chen Z, Finck BN, Han DH, Magkos F, Conte C, Bradley D, Fraterrigo G, Eagon JC, Patterson BW, Colonna M, Klein S. Association Between Specific Adipose Tissue CD4(+) T-Cell Populations and Insulin Resistance in Obese Individuals. Gastroenterology. 2013 Aug.

Fabbrini E, Higgins PB, Magkos F, Bastarrachea RA, Voruganti VS, Comuzzie AG, Shade RE, Gastaldelli A, Horton JD, Omodei D, Patterson BW, Klein S. Metabolic response to high-carbohydrate and low-carbohydrate meals in a nonhuman primate model. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2013 Feb 15.

Miller BV 3rd, Patterson BW, Okunade A, Klein S. Fatty acid and very low density lipoprotein metabolism in obese African American and Caucasian women with type 2 diabetes. J Lipid Res. 2012 Dec.

Fraterrigo G, Fabbrini E, Mittendorfer B, O'Rahilly S, Scherer PE, Patterson BW, Klein S. Relationship between Changes in Plasma Adiponectin Concentration and Insulin Sensitivity after Niacin Therapy. Cardiorenal Med. 2012 Aug.

Han DH, Kim SH, Higashida K, Jung SR, Polonsky KS, Klein S, Holloszy JO. Ginsenoside Re rapidly reverses insulin resistance in muscles of high-fat diet fed rats. Metabolism. 2012 Nov.

Magkos F, Fabbrini E, Conte C, Patterson BW, Klein S. Relationship between adipose tissue lipolytic activity and skeletal muscle insulin resistance in nondiabetic women. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jul.

Hall AM, Kou K, Chen Z, Pietka TA, Kumar M, Korenblat KM, Lee K, Ahn K, Fabbrini E, Klein S, Goodwin B, Finck BN. Evidence for regulated monoacylglycerol acyltransferase expression and activity in human liver. J Lipid Res. 2012 May.

Klein S, Fabbrini E, Patterson BW, Polonsky KS, Schiavon CA, Correa JL, Salles JE, Wajchenberg BL, Cohen R. Moderate effect of duodenal-jejunal bypass surgery on glucose homeostasis in patients with type 2 diabetes. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Jun.

Fabbrini E, Magkos F, Patterson BW, Mittendorfer B, Klein S. Subclinical hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism have opposite effects on hepatic very-low-density lipoprotein-triglyceride kinetics. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Mar.

Sullivan S, Fabbrini E, Horton JD, Korenblat K, Patterson BW, Klein S. Lack of a relationship between plasma PCSK9 concentrations and hepatic lipoprotein kinetics in obese people. Transl Res. 2011 Nov.

Mittendorfer B, Horowitz JF, DePaoli AM, McCamish MA, Patterson BW, Klein S. Recombinant human leptin treatment does not improve insulin action in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes. 2011 May.

Reeds DN, Patterson BW, Okunade A, Holloszy JO, Polonsky KS, Klein S Ginseng and ginsenoside Re do not improve β-cell function or insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2011 May.

For more articles and abstracts, take this off-site link to the National Library of Medicine Pub Med page for Dr. Samuel Klein.

Washington University Physicians are the medical staff of  Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Children's Hospital - St. Louis Employment   About Us   Top Stories   For Your Protection      Site Map
Copyright 2014 Washington University School of Medicine
Copyright 2014 Washington University School of Medicine