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Your Health Update

It is our goal to keep you informed with the latest from our physicians about your health. The following are articles that have appeared in past issues of Your Health Update -- our quarterly e-newsletter sent to 6000+ subscribers

About Your Health Update

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The e-newsletter is tailored to your individual health interests and lifestyle. You can subscribe by registering here  and each new issue will be emailed directly to you. Sign up today. In the meantime, read below to see what you've been missing.



Allergy and Asthma


Spring Time Means Allergy Time for Some

Washington University Sinus Institute performs a number of tests to determine what you are allergic to, and then develops a plan to bring you some relief.



Back and Neck Pain

The Strain of Back Pain

When your back hurts, it seems as if everything hurts. Low back pain can be caused by several different factors – muscles, ligaments, nerves, disc problems and stress.  Dr. Anthony Guarino,
Washington University pain management specialist, offers solutions to help ease back pain.


Work Can Be A Pain In The Neck

Time spent at work sitting at a desk, without the proper posture, can cause chronic neck and shoulder pain. Debra McDonnell, PT, DPT, expresses the importance of having a physical therapist assess your postural alignment and learn how ergonomic changes can relieve some of the pain.


Back Pain Doesn't Have To Be A Strain

What most people don't realize is back pain can be cured or managed.  Are you living in Pain? A visit to Washington University Orthopedic Spine Center is an appointment you can't afford not to make.


Coordinated Care for Spinal Tumors

Dr. Jacob Buchowski, head of the Washington University Center for Spinal Tumors, and his associates can perform a number of treatments in one place.


Bone Health

Vitamin D - It Does the Bones Good

We need more as we age, and eating foods that contain vitamin D may not be enough. Dr. Carolyn Jachna, a Washington University specialist in bone and mineral diseases, explains.


Strength from the Inside Out

Most of us aren't getting enough calcium and vitamin D, but there are ways to keep our bones healthy and strong.  Dr. Roberto Civitelli gives the details.



Your Mom Was Right - Sit Up Straight

Poor posture may be to blame for your headache after staring at the computer for hours. Mary Kate McDonnell, Washington University physical therapist, offers tips to prevent them.


D Stands for Deficiency in Female Soccer Players

Heidi Prather, DO, studied over 200 female St. Louis soccer players – from grade-schoolers to professionals. She says the research shows female soccer players at every age are at risk for stress fractures because of an imbalance between energy consumption and energy expenditure.



Bladder Issues

Encouraging Outlook for Bladder Cancer

Dr. Robert Grubb, III a urologic surgeon at Washington University explains the leading edge techniques for treating this cancer as well as access to clinical trials for patients diagnosed with bladder cancer.


Brain and Nervous System
 

Pushing the Time Envelope for Stroke Treatment

A stroke center is where you want to go when time is crucial. Dr. Jin-Moo Lee, Washington University neurologist and head of the cerebrovascular disease section of the department of neurology, explains why it is a better choice.


Trembling Hand - Not Necessarily Parkinson Disease

Washington University's neurologist at the Neuroscience Center will be able to determine if you are in early stages of Parkinson disease, or if it's an essential tremor which is the most common form of abnormal trembling -- primarily of the hands.


Fighting Concussions Head On

Washington University neurologist Maurizio Corbetta, MD, says time is of the essence, it is important to see a concussion specialist as soon as possible after the injury.


Time is Brain

Dr. Peter Panagos, Washington University emergency medicine specialist and BJH Stroke Network co-director, explains stroke symptoms and why it is important to move quickly to the right place.



Celebral Aneurysms - When they Require Surgery

Dr. Gregory Zipfel, neurosurgeon and co-director of the Washington University Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center explains the risk factors, characteristics and treatment options for cerebral aneurysms.


Cancer Treatment

Encouraging Outlook for Bladder Cancer

Dr. Robert Grubb, III a urologic surgeon at Washington University explains the leading edge techniques for treating this cancer as well as access to clinical trials for patients diagnosed with bladder cancer.


Navigating Through Cancer Treatments

Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine has developed the Navigator Program to help new cancer patients find their way through those first appointments.


New Melanoma Treatments on the Horizon

Melanoma can spread from the changing mole on your skin to your internal organs. There are new medical and surgical treatments available for this quickly spreading cancer  Dr. Ryan Fields, a Washington University cancer surgeon, will explain the importance of seeking immediate medical attention.


Colon and Rectal Conditions

Don't Take Hemorrhoids Sitting Down

Dr. Paul Wise, associate professor of surgery in colon and rectal surgery at Washington University,  explains that there is other anorectal problems that have similar symptoms, and it is important to see your doctor any time bleeding from the rectum occurs.


Tracking Polyps to Prevent Colon Cancer

Washington University gastroenterologist, Dr. Dayna Early, reviews testing options to ensure that colon cancer is caught and treated in a timely manner.



Cosmetic Surgery


Face to Face - Options for Aging Gracefully

Dr. Gregory Branham,
Washington University facial plastic and reconstructive surgeon, reviews the options available in facial plastic surgery.


Tummy Tuck - The Finishing Touch

A number of options are available to help achieve a flat tummy, provided by Dr. Terry Myckatyn and  Dr. Marissa Tenenbaum of West County Plastic Surgeons of Washington University.


Don't Let Drooping Eyelids Keep you Down

Dr. Philip Custer, Washington University oculoplastic surgeon, identifies the causes and treatment options for sad, puppy dog peepers.


Rhinoplasty Decision -- (Almost) As Plain As The Nose On Your Face

Dr. Greg Branham, a Washington University specialist in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery says understanding the potential benefits or risks of the procedure is the first step in making an informed decision about surgery.


Dermatology

Sunscreens - The Most Important Part of Your Summer Wardrobe

Dr. Eva Hurst, Washington University dermatologic surgeon, explains the numbers.


Mole Call - Pay Attention to Changes in your Moles

Skin cancer is commonly found in moles; a simple biopsy can diagnose it. Dr. David Sheinbein, Washington University dermatology specialist, can spot the spots.


Scratching and Itching and Rashes - Oh, My!

If you have an irritating skin problem, Washington University Dermatology in West County may be able to scratch your itch.



New Melanoma Treatments on the Horizon

Do you have an irregular shaped spot on your arm or another area of your body?  Could it be melanoma, a quick growing form of skin cancer?  If so, Dr. Ryan Fields, a Washington University cancer surgeon, will explain the importance of seeking immediate medical attention.


Sunscreen - Don't Leave Home Without It

Washington University dermatologist, Kara Nunley, MD, says, “Unprotected sun exposure to UVA and UVB rays causes damage to the skin, leading to premature aging and an increased risk of skin cancers including melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.


ABCDE -- Alphabet Guideline for Early Detection of Melanoma


Dr. Kara Nunley, Washington University dermatologist, stresses that most skin cancers are very treatable is caught early.  Asymmetry, Border, Color, Diameter, Evolving; a guideline for early detection of this disease.


Diabetes

Beating Diabetes to the Punch

Dottie Durbin, Washington University diabetes educator, talks about diabetes risk factors and blood sugars.


Ears, Noses and Throats

The Sounds of Silence

If you find yourself often yelling "What?!", maybe you could use a little help form Dr. Michael Valente, director of adult audiology at Washington University.He is the head of a service that fits almost every brand and type of hearing device.


Inside Passage to Causes of Sinus Infections

Have you been missing work, school or family activities due to sinus infections?  If so, you might consider a visit with Dr. Stanley Thawley, director of the Sinus Institute, who will take a look at the whole picture and help you manage the long-term problem you have been dealing with.


Rhinoplasty Decision -- (Almost) As Plain As The Nose On Your Face

Dr. Gregory Branham,a Washington University specialist in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery says, understanding the potential benefits or risks of the procedure is the first step in making an informed decision about surgery.



When Saliva Doesn't Go With The Flow

Have you been told you have a salivary stone?  Washington University ear, nose and throat specialist, Dr. Aliison, Ogden and Dr. Brian Nussenbaum, are both trained in the sialendoscopy procedure, a minially invasive, which is very successful in removing salivary stones. 


Hear and There, Treatment Options For Otosclerosis

Have you finally noticed how difficult it was to understand what others were saying? Is it time for a hearing test? Dr. Jon McJunkin, Washington University ear, nose and throat specialist, explains the treatment options for otosclerosis – a condition of the middle ear that can cause conductive hearing loss.


Emotions

Winter Blues - See the Light

Feeling depressed, fatigue, anxious and sad.  This could be a condition known as SAD (seasonal affective disorder). Dr. Eric Lenze, a geratric psychiatrist, at Washington University describes how bright light therapy helps patients with this condition.


Treating Depression With Magnetic Therapy

Dr. Pilar Cristancho,Washington University psychiatrist, explains the TMS non-invasive therapy treatment for patients with depression, especially people who have tried other therapy.


Gut and Tummy Conditions

New, Less Invasive Gallbladder Surgery Hits the Spot

The days of huge scars from gallbladder surgery will soon be a thing of the past. Dr. L. Michael Brunt of the Washington University Institute of Minimally Invasive Surgery are performing a new technique that will likely become the new standard.



Heart Disease

Knowing Your Numbers

Dr. Thomas Bartholet, Washington University primary care physician, stresses the importance of understanding your cholesterol report.


Heart to Heart, Woman to Woman

Woman can not ignore the fact that heart disease is the number one killer among women.  Washington University Cardiology  has a cadre of physicians and surgeons - all female - who specializes in the care of women with heart indications.  To learn more, visit the Heart Disease in Women .


Sudden Death in Young Athletes

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is usually a hereditary disease that can be missed by physicians not attuned to its subtle diagnostic clues.


New Approaches for Heart Valve Replacement


Washington University chief of cardiac surgery, Dr. Ralph Damiano, explains, “Heart valves require surgery when they fail to either open or close completely.


EKG vs. Echo - A Woman's Heart Health can Depend on Both

One is not enough when it concerns your ticker. Dr. Julio Perez, Director of Echocardiography at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, describes the two tests and why they are both necessary.


Infections

Don't Bring Home Any Unwanted Souvenirs

Are you planning an exotic abroad vacation?  Are you looking for a dream trip or a medical  nightmare?  Dr. Stephen Lawrence, a infectious disease specialist at Washington University Travel Health Clinic, can give you detailed advice, pre-travel immunizations and prescriptions to prevent any unwanted souvenirs from your travels abroad.


ABC's of Tetanus Boosters for Adults

Are you one that thinks a little cut or a deep wound isn't a big deal, nothing to worry about?  Dr. Lauren Ludwig of WUCA-Maryland Medical Group explains the importance of the adult tetanus boosters.



The 411 on Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease 

Is your little one not feeling well -- does she have a low-grade fever, tiny blisters in her mouth and on her hands and feet.  St. Louis Children's Hospital Answer Line  (454 KIDS) is a great source for questions regarding your child's health.


Kidney Disease

Home Dialysis: Life Saving But Not Life Restricting

Dr. Brent Miller,
Washington University renal specialist, explains the benefits of home dialysis for kidney disease patients.


Take My Kidney Stones - Please!

Dr. Alana Desai, Washington University urologist, explains what causes kidney stones, and what you can do to prevent them.


Lifestyle

Home Safe Home

Because keeping the home environment safe is vital to maintaining independence, Adam Pearson, OTD, OTR/L, talks about home safety assessments and consulting for home modifications to help decrease the risk of future falls.



Switching Lanes

Are you concerned that your parents may not be a safe driver anymore.  Dr. David Carr, who specializes in geriatric medicine at Washington University offers some words of advice for adult children to help handle this delicate situation with their aging parents.


Health Begins at Home 

Making good choices for meals, snacks and physical activity begins in the home. Debra Haire-Joshu, PhD is looking for mothers that would like to participate in the HEALTH (Healthy Eating and Active Living Taught at Home) study funded by the National Institutes of Health.


Lungs

What is Pulmonary Hypertension

Shortness of breath, dizziness, fainting, ankle swelling?  Symptoms like this could be a condition called Pulmonary Hypertension.  If you have these symptoms Dr. Murali Chakinala, head of the treatment center for pulmonary hypertension at Washington University suggest that you call and make an appointment to be evaluated.


Ophthalmology and Eye Care

The Basics of LASIK

Dr. Anjali Pathak, medical director of the Washington University Refractive Surgery Center, discusses LASIK candidates and procedures.


Looking At What Causes Eye Floaters

Am I seeing things?  Strands, particles or specks, knows as "floaters" are typically related to age-related changes in the eye as explained by Washington University's ophthalmologist, Dr. P. Kumar Rao.


Lasik Report Card

LASIK is best treating low and moderate myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), and astigmatism.  Dr. Linda Tsai, Washington University ophthalmologist, explains the procedure.


Watching for Thyroid Eye Disease


Dr. Stephen Couch explains the symptoms that you might be experiencing with your eyes if you have been diagnosed with thyroid disease.



Orthopedics

As the Ankle Turns

Dr. Sandra E. Klein, Washington University orthopedic surgeon, discusses ankle arthroscopy and surgery options.


What You Need To Know About Knee Pain

Dr. Mark Halstead, Washington University pediatric sports medicine specialist, explains the best way to develop the kind of strength necessary to prevent knee pain through resistance training.


Twist and Shout - Wrist Pain is Nothing to Sing About

Dr. Daniel Osei, hand and wrist orthopedic specialist explains, “Pain on the radial, or thumb side, of the wrist, is commonly caused by inflammation along the tendons extending from the forearm and wrist into the base of the thumb, and is known as de Quervain’s tendonitis.”


Back Pain Doesn't Have To Be A Strain

What most people don't realize is back pain can be cured or managed. Are you living in Pain? A visit to Washington University Orthopedic Spine Center is an appointment you can't afford not to make.


D Stands for Deficiency in Female Soccer Players

Dr. Heidi Prather studied over 200 female St. Louis soccer players from primary school to professionals. She says the research shows female soccer players at every age are at risk for stress fractures because of an imbalance between energy consumption and energy expenditure.


Numb's the Word - It's Not Always Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

If you have tingling in your ring and pinkie finger, you may have cubital tunnel syndrome. Dr. Ryan Calfee, Washington University orthopedic specialist, discusses the difference and treatment options.


Bunions - Not so Happy Feet

A Washington University orthopedic foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Sandra Klein, says bunions often run in families, and they don't always require treatment.


Get Hip To Resurfacing

Nearly one in four Americans will develop osteoarthritis of the hip during his or her lifetime. According to Dr Robert Barrack, Washington University orthopedic surgeon, “Hip resurfacing is an option for patients with hip abnormalities, including osteoarthritis.


Coordinated Care for Spinal Tumors

Dr. Jacob Buchowski, head of the Washington University Center for Spinal Tumors, and his associates can perform a number of treatments in one place.


"Pop" Goes the Tendon

Dr. Matthew Smith, Washington University orthopedic surgeon, discusses the symptoms and treatment of a distal biceps tendon injury.


Helping Hands:  The Peterson Hand Center

No matter what type of hand or wrist problem you may have, one of the six fellowship-trained surgeons at The Peterson Hand Center offer excellence in adult and pediatric surgical and non-surgical hand care.


Healing Heel Pain

Dr. Sandra Klein,
Washington University orthopedic surgeon, discusses the difference between Achilles tendinitis and plantar fascilitis, and how to relieve the pain.


When to Worry About Groin Pain

Groin pain can be caused by more than a pulled muscle.  Recurrent episodes of groin pain or pain that gets worse over time, might be a result of an underlying hip problem. Maybe it's time to be evaluated by Dr. Ryan Nunley.  


ACL Tears Can be a Repeat Performance

Dr. Rick Wright, Washington University orthopedic surgeon, reveals that it can happen more than once, and surgery is the best fix for a torn ACL.


If the Shoe Doesn't Fit - Don't Wear It


Sandra Klein, MD, Washington University orthopedic surgeon, specializing in the foot and ankle, says “A bunion is more than a bump on the side of your foot. It is a bone deformity of the great toe that is frequently hereditary.


Hip Check

What could cause a healthy young athlete to be so disabled with hip pain?  Dr. John Clohisy,  professor of orthopedic surgery, explains that hip impingement could be the cause and has been observed in certain athletes (football, baseball, soccer, tennis, hockey, lacrosse players, dancers, and golfers).


Pediatrics - Children and Teens

Is It Strep?

Dr. Rachel Orscheln, Washington University pediatric infectious disease specialist, explains the symptoms of strep throat in your child.



Hypothyroidism: A Growing Problem

If you notice your teenager's pants from last year are tighter but not shorter, there may be an explanation. Dr. Bess Marshall, Washington University specialist in pediatric endocrinology and metabolism, presents information on hypothyroidism.


Big Whoop -- What to Know About Whooping Cough


Is your child’s persistent cough just a cough or is it whooping cough? St. Louis Children's Answer Line (314 454 KIDS) answers the most commonly asked questions about this disease.


Don't Ignore the Snore

If your little one is sawing trees, it may mean more than you initially thought. Dr. Allison Ogden, Washington University otolaryngologist, discusses the symptoms and treatment options.


D Stands for Deficiency in Female Soccer Players

Dr. Heidi Prather studied over 200 female St. Louis soccer players – from grade-schoolers to professionals. She says the research shows female soccer players at every age are at risk for stress fractures because of an imbalance between energy consumption and energy expenditure.


The 411 on Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease 

Is your little one not feeling well -- does she have a low-grade fever, tiny blisters in her mouth and on her hands and feet.  St. Louis Children's Hospital Answer Line  - 314 454 KIDS - is a great source for questions regarding your child's health.


Sudden Death in Young Athletes

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is usually a hereditary disease that can be missed by physicians not attuned to its subtle diagnostic clues.


Responding to Food Allergies

Dr. Leonard Bacharier, clinical director of Washington University  pediatric allergy, immunology and pulmonary medicine  summarizes what to look for if you suspect a food is the cause of an allergic reaction.


Don't Let Exercise-Induced Asthma Stop the Game

Dr. Leonard Bacharier, a Washington University specialist in pediatric asthma and allergy, offers tips and advice on how your child can participate in exercise and sports activities even if they suffer from asthma.


Understanding Teen Internet Addiction

Dr. Sarah Garwood,  Washington University specialist in adolescent medicine, sheds light on the warning signs that your teen could be online too much.


Going, Going, Gone - UTI's in the Very Young

If your tot is suddenly hesitant to do the potty dance, a UTI might be the culprit. More information is given by Dr. S. Paul Hmiel, Washington University specialist in pediatric nephrology.


Physical Therapy and Sports

Your Mom Was Right - Sit Up Straight

Poor posture may be to blame for your headache after staring at the computer for hours. Mary Kate McDonnell, PT, DPT, Washington University physical therapist, offers tips to prevent them.


On The Move - Get Moving, Get Healthy

Washington University's Physical Therapy Clinic offers a unique group exercise program for men and women who are overweight or obese.  "On The Move", specialized exercise program, is conducted by a physical therapist, who can give you personalized attention and individualized modifications, if needed.


RICE Your Strains and Sprains

Rest, Ice, Compressions and Elevation --- the earlier treatment is started after a minor injury, such as a sprain, strain, bruising or a pulled muscle the better it works.  Dr. Randall Howell, director of the emergency room at Barnes-Jewish West County Hospital, states that all 4 parts of RICE treatment should be done at the same time.


These Shoes Were Made For Walkin' 

The experts from Washington University Program In Physical Therapy provides some valuable advice on how to pick out the right pair of walking shoes.


Prostate Disease

Prostate Cancer - It's Personal

Dr. Jeff Michalski, Washington University radiation oncologist, discusses treatment options for prostate cancer.



Prostate Cancer doesn't always have to be a Radical Decision

A new device is revolutionizing treatment for men with prostate cancer. Dr. Gerald Andriole, Jr. chief of urologic surgery at Washington University School of Medicine, describes how it works.


Bigger Is Not Better

Although many men suffer through benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) for years, the condition tends to gradually worsen over time. Washington University urologists employ the full range of options and treatment alternatives for men with BPH.



Radiology

Do Pay Attention To That Man Behind the Screen

Advanced imaging, like CT scans and MRIs are crucial in diagnosing complicated diseases and conditions. Washington University radiologists at Barnes-Jewish and Barnes-Jewish West County Hospital have even more training within their field (called subspecialists) which provide guarantees that the smallest detail will be noticed.


Veins and Arteries

Varicose Veins Don't Discriminate

Men and women are susceptible to these painful, unsightly and swollen blood vessels under the skin.  Dr. Patrick Geraghty explains the reasons why people who stand or sit for a long time are susceptible to varicose veins.


Getting A Leg Up On Peripheral Arterial Disease

Leg pain that has increased in severity accompanied with weakness and fatigue.  Your physician suspects peripheral arterial disease (PAD).  Dr. Jeffrey Jim  says PAD or blockage in the arteries, is a common disease process that affects both men and women.


Weight Management

Don't Rule Out Eating Out 

Great tips for eating out --- thanks to the nutritionists at the  Washington University's Physical Therapy program



Tummy Tuck - The Finishing Touch

A number of options are available to help achieve a flat tummy, provided by Dr. Terry Myckatyn and Dr. Marissa Tenenbaum of West County Plastic Surgeons of Washington University.


Women's Health -

Freeze Frame - A New Way to Preserve A Woman's Eggs

There are many reasons a young woman would want to preserve her fertility.  Dr. Sarah Keller, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and head of the egg donor program at Washington University School of Medicine, wants women to know there is another valuable tool available to help preserve their fertility and hope it will make an important difference for many families.



Catch the Digital Mam Van

Inconvenience can't be your excuse for not getting your yearly mammogram.  Thanks to the Joanne Knight Breast Health Center at the Siteman Cancer Center their digital mammography van is scheduled to visit neighborhoods throughout the St. Louis and Illinois areas.


When Conceiving Isn't Easy

If you need answers and help conceiving, you can't afford not to visit Washington University School of Medicine, Infertility and Reproductive Medicine Center who evaluates and treats more than 2,000 couples each year to treat and diagnose the causes of infertility.


Spare the Uterus, Save the Bikini Line


Dr. Michael Darcy, chief of interventional radiology for the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (MIR) at Washington University, performs a procedure which is far more attractive to the fibroid sufferer - especially when summer rolls around.


No Incision Decision

Is your family complete? Do you need to discuss your options for preventing future pregnancies?  Washington University Urologic Surgery can answer any questions about the range of options provided to men who want to take the step and will explain the new method called no-scalpel vasectomy that simplifies the procedure. 


Sometimes Hysterectomy is the Answer, Sometimes It Isn't

Have you been advised to undergo a hysterectomy and are interested in learning about other treatment options?  Dr. Scott Biest, director of minimally invasive gynecology at Washington University, talks about other medical options you might consider.


Heart to Heart; Women to Women

Woman can not ignore the fact that heart disease is the number one killer amoung women.  Washington University cardiology, cardiac surgery and vascular surgery have a cadre of physicians and surgeons - all female - who specializes in the care of women with heart indications.  To learn more, visit the Heart Disease in Women

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Copyright 2014 Washington University School of Medicine